About Us

Our Story

Fifteen years ago three South Australian ophthalmologists Drs. James Muecke, Henry Newland and Bob Casson, whilst volunteering on sight–saving projects in Asia, saw a gap in the provision of eye health services in our neighbouring developing countries.

This gap spawned the seed of an idea that the doctors could offer something unique to improve the sight of tens of thousands. By working with their foreign colleagues, areas of need were identified, and by providing sub-specialty education and equipping eye clinics, a sustainable sight-saving model was born. This model became the basis of Sight For All.

Vision

Create a world where everyone can see

Mission

SFA empowers communities to deliver comprehensive, evidence-based, high quality eye health care through the provision of research, education and equipment.

Values

Collaboration – Encouraging participation of all stakeholders.

Sustainability – Fostering self-reliance through comprehensive evidence-based projects.

Respect – Promoting human rights in all dealings.

Our Sight Saving Work

Sight For All raises funds to deliver eye health care projects free of charge to our partner countries and communities. The nature of our projects include:

Collaborative Research

  • Adult blindness studies
  • Childhood blindness and refractive error studies
  • Studies to investigate the genetics of blinding diseases
  • Studies to explore the outcome of eye surgeries
  • Studies to determine the impact of eye health awareness initiatives
  • Equipment and facility upgrades at training and regional centres
  • Establishment of subspecialty units, eg: glaucoma, ophthalmic plastic surgery, paediatric ophthalmology, and retina.
  • Workshops and curriculum development for ophthalmologists in-training.
  • Continued education, leadership and train the trainer workshops for graduate ophthalmologists.
  • Extended hands-on subspecialty fellowships both in Australia and in partner countries (reverse fellowships)
  • Workshops to train ophthalmologists in the fitting of contact lenses
  • Cataract and diabetic eye disease awareness campaigns
  • Vision screening to identify refractive errors in blinding diseases in schoolchildren

Infrastructure Support

  • Equipment and facility upgrades at training and regional centres
  • Establishment of subspecialty units, eg: glaucoma, ophthalmic plastic surgery, paediatric ophthalmology, and retina.

Sustainable Education

  • Workshops and curriculum development for ophthalmologists in-training.
  • Continued education, leadership and train the trainer workshops for graduate ophthalmologists.
  • Extended hands-on subspecialty fellowships both in Australia and in partner countries (reverse fellowships)
  • Workshops to train ophthalmologists in the fitting of contact lenses

Eye Health Awareness

  • Cataract and diabetic eye disease awareness campaigns
  • Vision screening to identify refractive errors in blinding diseases in schoolchildren

Did you know?

45 million = the number of people worldwide who are blind.

90% of these people live in developing countries.

Did you know?

Throughout the world 270 million people are vision impaired due to eye disease or lack of glasses.

80% of this visual impairment is preventable or treatable.

Did you know?

Throughout the world there are 1.4 million children who are blind.

Asia is home to two thirds of the world’s blind children.

Did you know?

Up to half of all children in schools for the blind in developing countries have blindness that could have been avoided.

Did you know?

10,000 = the amount of hours Sight For All’s team of eye care specialists will donate to sight-saving training overseas each year.

$0 = the amount that Sight For All’s team of eye care specialists will be paid for their critical work.

Did you know?

Glaucoma is the leading cause of preventable blindness.

Diabetic eye disease is the fastest growing cause of vision loss in many poor communities of the world.

Did you know?

Cataract is the leading cause of blindness among Aboriginal Australians. Unfortunately, less than one quarter of patients requiring surgery go through with their sight-restoring operations.

Did you know?

Diabetes is the fastest growing cause of visual loss in the adult Aboriginal population, but most with diabetes are not being adequately screened or treated for its blinding complications.

Did you know?

Sight For All trained Myanmar’s first children’s eye specialist, Dr Than Htun Aung, for 12 months in Adelaide. Since Dr Aung’s return home in 2010, there has been a 12 times increase in the number of children’s eye surgeries performed in Myanmar.

Did you know?

Sight For All has equipped 32 regional eye centres in Myanmar and 7 in Lao, allowing the eye surgeons to markedly increase the number of cataract surgeries they perform.